Drallitoc's Pestilence Stricken Town
#1
Once again I have to thank MellyMonkey for inspiring another project. Well - Sort of.

I have been trying to get through my Lustria set before I start my next project. I have long been toying with the idea of building a plague stricken imperial town. When MellyMonkey asked me to do a tutorial on leaded glass, I decided that I would really need a building to put the glass into (for the sake of context).

So I started building a Tudor style house and remembered seeing the following:  

(04-17-2015, 02:18 PM)MellyMonkey Wrote:
(04-17-2015, 11:45 AM)Caleb Wrote: Not much of a hunt. I could probably swing it if my camera complies.

It's always nice when they come willingly. Big Grin

Tob, I could see you doing examples of the benefits of Future floor polish or gesso... you champion these things quite often.

Off the top of my head, I wouldn't mind seeing someone going through how they take broken paint brushes or bullet casings and use them to stamp bricks. I've tried on my own and I'm obviously missing something because mine do not turn out like the pros.

This was something I had never heard of - but I instantly understood exactly what she meant by it. So I went and grabbed a .22 caliber bullet casing from my bits-box and did a quick test:
[Image: wall_zpsb0hgquho.jpg]

a surprisingly short time later - I am well on my way to having my first piece:
[Image: house_zpsqy5lb0uf.jpg]

I have some minor complaints about how it's turned out so far (some of the wood just looks too straight)- but I LOVE the brickwork!
 
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#2
DUDE! that brickwork is GORGEOUS!

I know that the .22 casing was something that one of the old TG veterans (havre, maybe?) used to great effect. It looks like you've got the technique pretty much perfected!
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#3
Now, having said that, I'm going to ask you to do a WIP tutorial on how you painted it as well.  Tongue
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#4
(08-10-2015, 05:42 PM)Munin Wrote: DUDE! that brickwork is GORGEOUS!

I know that the .22 casing was something that one of the old TG veterans (havre, maybe?) used to great effect. It looks like you've got the technique pretty much perfected!

I believe you are right, Munin. Havre did some great brickwork & cobblestone. The sheer quantity he would do makes me think he had some kind of stamp.

So, is there some kind of trick you've found in your first attempt? Mine never turn out that well.
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#5
(08-10-2015, 05:44 PM)Munin Wrote: Now, having said that, I'm going to ask you to do a WIP tutorial on how you painted it as well.  Tongue

I will see what I can do. It's really not that difficult - but at the same time... I'm supposed to be finishing other commitments first. 


(08-10-2015, 05:57 PM)MellyMonkey Wrote: So, is there some kind of trick you've found in your first attempt? Mine never turn out that well.

Not that I can think of... I don't know what your issue could be. I didn't have any problems. As long as you have good light and are paying attention to where you place the stamp - you can't go wrong (this really isn't a watch tv while you work project [although saying that I did have NCIS playing in the background the whole time]). 
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#6
I've watched another video recently using the metal band that holds an eraser to a pencil. I'm wondering if my edges weren't sharp enough to break the surface of the foam. I'll have to try this out again sometime.
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#7
That may be the problem. You don't actually need to break the surface. just indent it - the paint actually does most of the work.
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#8
(08-14-2015, 09:09 AM)SethDrallitoc Wrote: That may be the problem. You don't actually need to break the surface. just indent it - the paint actually does most of the work.

It likely depends on the type of foam you are using.  The extruded polystyrene insulating panels I use for most of my work are far too firm to take impressions.  Even when smashed with chunks of concrete, the foam barely scuffs and just sends the concrete flying back at you.

Perhaps you can share your type (and source) of foam that you used so that others will know what material works well with this method.

Oh, and I'm very sure that folks would love a detailed description of your painting techniques. Big Grin
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#9
Oh. My. God. I'm freaking out about how gorgeous that is. I totally have to ask for a painting tutorial too. Those bricks are boss-- and the painting job is definitely half the battle!
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#10
(08-14-2015, 01:37 PM)ableman33 Wrote: Perhaps you can share your type (and source) of foam that you used so that others will know what material works well with this method.

Owens Corning FOAMULAR 250

Owens Corning Foamular 250 - From Home Depot.

Painting tutorial is in progress.
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