Tips for stone floors
#1
So obviously I've been using that foam for stonework up until now but I'm looking to create a dollhouse room/backdrop for photography in a fantasy style and I thought of some classic hardwood walls and a stone floor as a simple thang that can suit a few genres. It didn't seem likely to me that I'd cut a thin sheet of the foam to carve. The idea of cutting individual bits of foam seems daunting. Wood chips that are filed and shaped don't seem like they'd really have a wood texture. Obviously though, whatever it is would probably be a bit thin (because floor.) and have to be flat enough to reasonably put small items on without them keeling over left and right-- but of course to have more dimension than a faux finish fake stone paint job or something.

I was thinking of irregular, semi-interlocked, just sort of typical 'fantasy castle' or 'fantasy building' flooring. Something that could pass off as a temple in one photo or Hogwarts interior in another, you know? Would anyone have any recommendations? I'm not even sure where to start here.
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#2
Cereal box card. You can cut out your flagstones individually with a pair of scissors. For cracked texture, your can score it with a pen just like you would with foam.

Alternately, foamcore with the paper removed from one of the sides. This gives you a thin layer of exposed foam (which is easy to texture however you want) that still has a paper backing on the "down" side. Removing the paper from foamcore is a little bit of an art, though, so try it on a few small pieces first.

3rd alternative - they make a particular kind of foam in very thin sheets. It's called Depron I think? You can get it at most craft/hobby stores, usually in the scrapbooking aisle.

For a wood floor, you're probably better off creating your texture with paint, although it's a little difficult to make look right at scale. Again, practice is probably required.
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#3
These are all really good ideas! I think I will try the foamboard with one side of the paper peeled off first. Thanks!
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#4
You can get a good wood-plank effect quite quickly and easily with plastic card. Scribe in lines for the individual planks, then create the wood-grain texture by dragging a wire brush over it, from end to end — don't scrub back and forth. If so desired, you can impress knot-holes and nail-holes with a stylus. Then the whole thing is a breeze to paint with washes and glazes to bring out the texture.

Oil paint, thinned and laid on with a light touch and a coarse, bristle brush gives a good wood-grain effect too — it's a bit more refined than the scribing and scratching method, and it's better suited to 3-dimensional objects.

[edit] I don't know why on earth I thought we were talking about wood effects rather than stone like it says right there in the thread title, f'chri'sakes, but there you go. Hmm.
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#5
(08-28-2015, 10:14 AM)Munin Wrote: Cereal box card. You can cut out your flagstones individually with a pair of scissors. For cracked texture, your can score it with a pen just like you would with foam.

I'll second the cereal box and add a tip.

First, the cereal box card has a smooth and a coarse side. Coarse side has more texture, so I'll use that side  up/out/visible. I cut mine about 1" square for DnD grid maps, but any size should work. I want to nip the corners, have some not quite perfect squares with gaps between them, and even cut a few  to show breakage of field stones after they've been placed. Finally, I roll them tight to around the coarse side (coarse side in), which creates ripples and bends. You can roll the card before or after you cutting the squares -- at one inch, usually cut first and roll second.

Paint any rocky shade, wash and drybrush. You can you the classic gray/black/white, or really explore some subtle shading for much richer yet still understated colors, or do a checker-board tiled effect with two tones. I've even airbrushed yellow to try to show where sun-beams are passing through windows--maybe a more talented artist could have pulled this off better...

-Asdel
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#6
Cereal Box may be cool, I personally haven't tried it, but one tip that I came across was using corkboard. It's elevated, easy to cut and/or to rip (for a more natural look), t's got a good texture, all you need is some filler to look like mortar. Just a suggestion, might be something cool to try.
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#7
(08-28-2015, 10:14 AM)Munin Wrote: Cereal box card. You can cut out your flagstones individually with a pair of scissors. For cracked texture, your can score it with a pen just like you would with foam.

Alternately, foamcore with the paper removed from one of the sides. This gives you a thin layer of exposed foam (which is easy to texture however you want) that still has a paper backing on the "down" side. Removing the paper from foamcore is a little bit of an art, though, so try it on a few small pieces first.

3rd alternative - they make a particular kind of foam in very thin sheets. It's called Depron I think? You can get it at most craft/hobby stores, usually in the scrapbooking aisle.

For a wood floor, you're probably better off creating your texture with paint, although it's a little difficult to make look right at scale. Again, practice is probably required.

A good tip I found from the TerrainTutor on how to remove the paper is using a heatgun. Here's a link to the video, fast forward to 45 minutes for the tip. Using the heatgun (or I assume a hairdrier could work too) he was able to easily remove the paper from the foamboard. However, if you're creating rough stone textures, it may speak more to realism if you shave it off with an exacto knife, that way you get some beveling and unevenness.
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#8
(09-03-2015, 05:44 PM)Kevin Wrote: A good tip I found from the TerrainTutor on how to remove the paper is using a heatgun. Here's a link to the video, fast forward to 45 minutes for the tip. Using the heatgun (or I assume a hairdrier could work too) he was able to easily remove the paper from the foamboard. However, if you're creating rough stone textures, it may speak more to realism if you shave it off with an exacto knife, that way you get some beveling and unevenness.

Oooh, very, very excellent. I forgot about his videos. He's pretty good, huh? That's really helpful. Thanks a lot!
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#9
I'll also second (third?) the cereal box card cut up into irregular stone shapes.

For extra texture, lightly crumble some aluminum foil and re-flatten it, then glue to your stone shapes with the "dull" side up, wrapping your stone shapes slightly.

Paint them however you wish.

BTW, this is not an original idea, got this from Wyloch's Crafting Vids (youtube), specifically, watch his video #8 - cave tiles.
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#10
(08-28-2015, 05:13 AM)BlueMeander Wrote: So obviously I've been using that foam for stonework up until now but I'm looking to create a dollhouse room/backdrop for photography in a fantasy style and I thought of some classic hardwood walls and a stone floor as a simple thang that can suit a few genres. It didn't seem likely to me that I'd cut a thin sheet of the foam to carve.

But you can get thin sheets of foam to carve. They can be scored with a ball point pen to look like flagstone.

Non-terrain builders call them styrofoam plates:

[Image: Weight-Loss-Set-Limits.jpg]

[Image: 9-Styro.jpg]


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