Relic Knight Esper Generator - WIP
#11
Hopefully what's below will enlighten y'all as to how I created the complex shapes in this project without having to rely on any serious math.

Drawing a hex

Your first decision is determining the length of the hex’s sides.  Everything else will hinge on that number.

Doubling that length = the distance from point-to-point of the Hex.

[Image: Hexagonal%20Structure%20Design%20Tutoria...x4llci.jpg]

To draw the desired hex you start with a pair of perpendicular lines with their intersection becoming the center point of the hex.

[Image: Hexagonal%20Structure%20Design%20Tutoria...sh7sej.jpg]

Centered on one of those lines you need to add a pair of parallel lines separated by the length of the hex’s side.  These along with your center point and the other perpendicular line will be how you define your three point-to-point lines.

[Image: Hexagonal%20Structure%20Design%20Tutoria...vdrj9y.jpg]

Drawing in the spokes only requires that you draw a line the same length as your hex’s sides from the center point to each of the parallel lines and along the perpendicular.

[Image: Hexagonal%20Structure%20Design%20Tutoria...gfw1xb.jpg]

All you have to do now is connect the ends of your spokes and you’ve got your hex.

[Image: Hexagonal%20Structure%20Design%20Tutoria...zpawpp.jpg]

Making the angled facets of the prism

You need to define the length of the sides of the hexagon you're transitioning to.  In my project the top hex had 1” sides and would widen out to a hex with 1.5” sides.

You also need to determine how much of an elevation change will be happening between the top and bottom.  With a little Pythagorean Theorem action and basic algebra you can sort out how tall the sections need to be.  Or you can skip all that silly math and just draw it out and measure the line connecting the two points and call it good. Smile

So the sections require a top side 1” wide and the bottom side 1.5” wide and a height of about 0.7”.  All you have to do is fill in the side angles by connecting the top and bottom end points.

[Image: Hexagonal%20Structure%20Design%20Tutoria...fxvhvk.jpg]

When I scribed all this out on the foamcore all I had to do was draw two parallel lines 0.7” wide and alternate marking 1” and 1.5” lengths and connecting the dots. resulting in the pile of bits in the top left of this picture.

[Image: Esper20Generator20WIP2012020-203_zpsunfp3xe1.jpg]

The interior angles can be quickly figured out by drawing them out using the 3/16” width of the foamcore.  But as I mentioned before, the inside wasn’t going to be visible so I just winged it.  I had the 1.5” hex drawn out and used it to guess at where to make my cuts.  Once the 6 sides were glued together, I cut the bottom so that the outer edges sat flush on the table top.  

So to sum up...  If you draw it out, you won’t need to do anything beyond basic arithmetic and being able to read a ruler.  I knew those industrial drafting classes I took in high school would pay off!   Tongue

-DavicusPrime
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#12
So I've been putting some time in to adding detail bits.  I'm thinking I have quite a lot more to do before I'll be ready for paint.  It just doesn't look busy enough.  I also decided to cut up a piece of Hardboard for a base.  So even more work to do.

Here's what I've done so far.

These are the major detail structures I've added to the three recessed sides:
[Image: Esper%20Generator%20WIP%203%20-%201_zpsgughnlfj.jpg]
[Image: Esper%20Generator%20WIP%203%20-%204_zpsjizplgux.jpg]
[Image: Esper%20Generator%20WIP%203%20-%202_zpssnlcekx0.jpg]
[Image: Esper%20Generator%20WIP%203%20-%205_zpsiw1ikvep.jpg]
[Image: Esper%20Generator%20WIP%203%20-%203_zpspjpeg47n.jpg]

Then I started in on the more finite details:
[Image: Esper%20Generator%20WIP%203%20-%206_zpsmrekjxgn.jpg]
[Image: Esper%20Generator%20WIP%203%20-%208_zpstnrubhzb.jpg]
[Image: Esper%20Generator%20WIP%203%20-%207_zpstoma6enr.jpg]
[Image: Esper%20Generator%20WIP%203%20-%209_zpsbl13vrnh.jpg]

You may have noticed that I gave up on making the electrical arcs as complicated as I was trying to make it.  Tongue   I just went ahead and bent up the wire and glued it them in.

The "Box" side will be getting a bit of nylon grating on one side and the other will be some kind of computer panel thingie.  Then I need to add a bunch of card and wires all over the place and then the hardboard base will be getting gussied up.

-DavicusPrime
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#13
Looking forward to see how you paint up those electrical arcs. (I think you nailed their shape perfectly.)

Don
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#14
If you wanted to go the extra mile, you could make the electrical arcs out of clear acrylic rod or stretched clear sprue, heat-bent into shape and then given a light sanding to roughen the surface, but leave the ends polished. Embed them so that the ends pass through into the body of the generator, where a battery-driven blue LED light is set — when the light is switched on, light passes in through the polished ends of the rods and is diffused out through the abraded surface.

It's a straightforward process, but finicky.
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#15
(03-04-2016, 06:13 PM)Fitz Wrote: If you wanted to go the extra mile, you could make the electrical arcs out of clear acrylic rod or stretched clear sprue, heat-bent into shape and then given a light sanding to roughen the surface, but leave the ends polished. Embed them so that the ends pass through into the body of the generator, where a battery-driven blue LED light is set — when the light is switched on, light passes in through the polished ends of the rods and is diffused out through the abraded surface.

It's a straightforward process, but finicky.

I very nearly suggested this exact same thing - seems a bit much though. 
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#16
While using LED's would be awesome, it's way beyond what I'm willing and able to do in the time period provided. Right now, the challenge is to add enough detail to keep it from looking too plain. And to then paint it such that it does the piece justice.

I'm more worried about botching the paint job than anything else. I'm the same with my miniatures. I put in all kinds of effort converting things then end up afraid to put paint on it for fear of wrecking all the effort I've put in up to that point.

-DavicusPrime
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#17
Better start practicing that OSL technique Smile

Looking great so far Smile

(Shame it was started before, as this could potentially be a Competition Entry)
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#18
This is awesome... while those wires weren't what you were planning, I think they turned out excellent. I, too, can't wait to see this painted!
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#19
I really like how you wrote and illustrated the process of drawing a regular haexagon. I will use that a LOT on future Infinity terrain projects!

Also I read an earlier post of how you wanted hard right angles in the electrical arcs. a constant arc's plasma between two electrodes does tend to be more curvy like that. Overall, I love it!
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#20
Here's another method of drawing hexagons precisely, using a compass:

http://mojobob.blogspot.co.nz/2016/04/how-to-draw-hexagon.html

[Image: HowToDrawAHexagon.gif]

It's very, very easy. You will need a compass, a pen and/or pencil, and a ruler to make measurements and draw straight lines.

  1. With the compass, draw a circle with the same radius as you want the length of the sides.
  2. With the ruler, draw a line exactly bisecting the circle by going through the hole the compass made in the centre.
  3. Draw two more circles with the compass, this time centring it at the points where the line bisects the circle.
  4. With the ruler, connect the points where the three circles overlap.
And that's it. You have a perfect hexagon drawn to precise measurements.



If you need to draw a hexagon with measurements from side to side, you will need these ratios:

[Image: HowToDrawAHexagon2.gif]

The circle will need to be 1.154 x the desired width of the hexagon, which means that the hexagon will be 0.86 x the diameter of the circle.

There you go. Easy-peasy.
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