First build (Warhammer 40k)
#1
After a suggestion by sethdrallitoc to start a WIP thread, here it is!


[Image: P_20160430_083116_zps2apb7j3r.jpg]

My first cut for the ruin, since then I have changed the overall height and the top floors window size. I'm using foam board/core I'm not sure of its proper name but its the stuff with cardboard on either side.

[Image: DSC_6390_zpsm2zac1yr.jpg]

[Image: DSC_6392_zpsesrnamur.jpg]

A little weathering and battle damage later and this is what I ended up with. Oh and the random pipe!
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#2
It wouldn't be WH40k without a random pipe. Wink That's like a WH Fantasy piece without a skull!

This is a great start. What a great example of how simple materials can come together quite nicely.
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#3
(05-05-2016, 09:08 PM)MellyMonkey Wrote: It wouldn't be WH40k without a random pipe. Wink That's like a WH Fantasy piece without a skull!

This is a great start. What a great example of how simple materials can come together quite nicely.

Dodgy None of my fantasy pieces have skulls, or skullz,... 


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#4
Sorry about the quality of the pictures. I have a crap camera.

I added texture using different grades of builders sand, I think it turned out okay.
But I feel theres something missing from the build. Maybe you guys can help.

[Image: P_20160506_005049_zpsnur80dgs.jpg]

[Image: P_20160506_005100_zpssdpelpkv.jpg]
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#5
Stick some toothpicks into the broken parts so it looks like rebar Smile
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#6
(05-07-2016, 06:09 AM)djmothra Wrote: Stick some toothpicks into the broken parts so it looks like rebar Smile

Thanks, I knew there was something I had forgot.
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#7
Other options for rebar include pieces of paperclip (plain metal or plastic coated ones), and solid copper wire (again, stripped or with the insulating plastic on), or for the really fancy, thick metal guitar strings.

If you want to go completely overboard, you can texture the surface of the exposed rebar before installing it by squeezing it with some pliers with ridged tips or by running them along the teeth of a file. Big Grin


This project is looking great! Happy building. Smile
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#8
Welcome! Glad to see a new member.

You're on a great start, and I hope you find terrain making as much fun as the rest of hobby. Ruins like this are a great way to put terrain on the table, and invoke the endless war of 40K well.

Here are some tips, from years of building.

1) Take notes, especially on paint schemes. In two years, you might want to recreate something, and need to look back on your notes for the specific techniques, brand and color of paint, the order the techniques applied, and tricks and insight learned. I don't suggest an essay, just enough to remind you of what you did.

2) Plan with storage in mind.  One piece of terrain like this is easy to store, but eight pieces like this will be cumbersome. I've settled on bankers' boxes, 14.75" deep, 12" wide, 10" high. I've precut 14.5"x12", 12"x7", and 6"x7" bases so I know any project I make will fit into the boxes. Depending on the project, you can get fancy with triangle shapes that fit together just so.  (I have found it helpful to mark the bottoms of these as a reminder of how they stack.)

For example, if your model was based on 8" x9" base, you'd get exactly one in such a box. If you went 6"x7", you'd get four pieces in a banker's box. Eight if you can stack two layers.

3) Personally, I don't really like these ruin corners if they don't form a building with four corners. This is entirely an esthetic compliant -- ruined corners like this are very useful for playing since the interior is readily accessible.

I would want four of them together to make a ruined building. However, the most cleaver approach may be to start with large base, cut it into four pieces, and now build four corners. This will allow you to have four corners for four separate buildings, or one large building, or two halves. If assembled into one building, you'd have no visible gaming table, which is often green grass.

Alternatively, you could build a matching piece of rubble to set behind your corner to fill out the remaining building, but with a much simpler, smaller, and lower project. This completes the building, provides a bit more cover, but is very easy since you're assembling it out of corners of left-over foam core, smallish rocks, what ever.

4) If you find the sand+PVA texture is coarser than you want, you can use spackle/drywall filler thinned a bit with water. I had PVA (Elmers White glue) for strength. This will add a finer texture if that is what you're looking for.

5) When it comes to painting, a standard approach is paint gray, wash black, drybrush white. This works great, and so it is a common practice. If you want a variant on this, you can vary the wash color. Green wash around the pipe would show leaking water and algea growth. Ruddy brown around the pipe would instead show rust lines.  If you replace the wash with dark blue here and dark green there, you might create a really subtle contrast. You could also go with a sand (a butter yellow) base color and a burnt sienna (reddish brown) wash for a warmer sandstone look. Maybe not in keeping with the grim future of 40K.

6) Photograph all your work. It is fun to see how your skill improves over time and to see how much you've accomplished in a year.
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#9
(05-07-2016, 08:54 AM)ableman33 Wrote: Other options for rebar include pieces of paperclip (plain metal or plastic coated ones), and solid copper wire (again, stripped or with the insulating plastic on), or for the really fancy, thick metal guitar strings.

If you want to go completely overboard, you can texture the surface of the exposed rebar before installing it by squeezing it with some pliers with ridged tips or by running them along the teeth of a file. Big Grin


This project is looking great!  Happy building. Smile
Thanks for the rebar alternatives and the kind words Smile
(05-07-2016, 09:15 AM)Asdel Wrote: Welcome! Glad to see a new member.

You're on a great start, and I hope you find terrain making as much fun as the rest of hobby. Ruins like this are a great way to put terrain on the table, and invoke the endless war of 40K well.

Here are some tips, from years of building.

1) Take notes, especially on paint schemes. In two years, you might want to recreate something, and need to look back on your notes for the specific techniques, brand and color of paint, the order the techniques applied, and tricks and insight learned. I don't suggest an essay, just enough to remind you of what you did.

2) Plan with storage in mind.  One piece of terrain like this is easy to store, but eight pieces like this will be cumbersome. I've settled on bankers' boxes, 14.75" deep, 12" wide, 10" high. I've precut 14.5"x12", 12"x7", and 6"x7" bases so I know any project I make will fit into the boxes. Depending on the project, you can get fancy with triangle shapes that fit together just so.  (I have found it helpful to mark the bottoms of these as a reminder of how they stack.)

For example, if your model was based on 8" x9" base, you'd get exactly one in such a box. If you went 6"x7", you'd get four pieces in a banker's box. Eight if you can stack two layers.

3) Personally, I don't really like these ruin corners if they don't form a building with four corners. This is entirely an esthetic compliant -- ruined corners like this are very useful for playing since the interior is readily accessible.

I would want four of them together to make a ruined building. However, the most cleaver approach may be to start with large base, cut it into four pieces, and now build four corners. This will allow you to have four corners for four separate buildings, or one large building, or two halves. If assembled into one building, you'd have no visible gaming table, which is often green grass.

Alternatively, you could build a matching piece of rubble to set behind your corner to fill out the remaining building, but with a much simpler, smaller, and lower project. This completes the building, provides a bit more cover, but is very easy since you're assembling it out of corners of left-over foam core, smallish rocks, what ever.

4) If you find the sand+PVA texture is coarser than you want, you can use spackle/drywall filler thinned a bit with water. I had PVA (Elmers White glue) for strength. This will add a finer texture if that is what you're looking for.

5) When it comes to painting, a standard approach is paint gray, wash black, drybrush white. This works great, and so it is a common practice. If you want a variant on this, you can vary the wash color. Green wash around the pipe would show leaking water and algea growth. Ruddy brown around the pipe would instead show rust lines.  If you replace the wash with dark blue here and dark green there, you might create a really subtle contrast. You could also go with a sand (a butter yellow) base color and a burnt sienna (reddish brown) wash for a warmer sandstone look. Maybe not in keeping with the grim future of 40K.

6) Photograph all your work. It is fun to see how your skill improves over time and to see how much you've accomplished in a year.
Definitely some things to think about, coming from an artistic background I have a fair idea on colours but I'm glad to hear from your experiance, even though I have a fair grasp of colour schemes sometimes I struggle when thinking about buildings. 
I had originally done a sketch of the ruined corner and the rest of the bbuilding but ultimately went with one corner for ease.

Again thankyou both for your valued input.
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#10
This looks pretty good! I like the blast damage; looks like someone tried to put an RPG thru the 2nd floor window but missed.

Seems like a complete piece, but if anything is missing I might say a little detritus. It just looks a little 'clean' for a war-torn ruined building. Some wind-blown paper litter and/or beer cans might collect in the corner. Some broken wooden boards might be scattered about. Rats.

And being as it's Warhammer, you could always slap a few recruitment posters or propaganda on the outside wall. I also personally believe that you can never go wrong with graffiti.

This is a great first project. Keep up this pace and you'll have a whole table by next week!
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