Slime dripping off a Lovecraftian Worm
#1
Hello!

This is my very first post, I found out about this forum by watching one of Terrain Wench's Summer 2015 Update.

Here is my question, I'm building a gigantic Lovecraftian worm and I'm going to have it come out of water in a swamp, since it's just rising out of the water I would like for slime to look like it's about to drip off the worm. So what technique should I use for this please and thank you! Smile
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#2
(04-29-2017, 03:35 PM)RavenZ Wrote: I would like for slime to look like it's about to drip off the worm.  

Welcome RavenZ!

I have a few ideas on this, but I must preface my remarks with a disclaimer that I have never made a Lovecraftian Worm
with slime dripping from it, so I can't really vouch for the efficacy of these techniques for your specific application.

But it comes down to this: viscosity. You're going to want something thick and sticky, right? So I can think of a few ways to get a 'globs of slime' look.

Hot glue might work. This is fairly simple to make blobs and globs and drippy things. The downside is that it would have to be painted, but you're going to have to paint most stuff anyway, so it's a toss up. If you have a glue gun you might want to spend some time experimenting with it to get the slime drips you're looking for.

A tube of caulk (the paintable kind) could also get the look you want to achieve. This might be easier to work than hot glue if you need a LOT of slime. It has a longer working time and you can spread it as well as glob it, and you could "pre-fab" some drips and stuff by drawing beads of caulk on waxed paper, letting it cure, then applying the slime globs to your worm. One advantage to this caulk would be that if you're using clear caulk and you want clear slime, no painting required. Experiment with this stuff before applying to your project to get the technique down.

Another possibility is epoxy/acrylic resin. Although this is runnier than the other ideas, if you use fast curing stuff you could freecast some good drips if you time everything just right. Another option is the waxed paper trick; drizzle some epoxy on waxed paper, let it cure, then peel it up and apply the drippy drizzles to your model. Again, this might take some experimentation/trial and error to get the look you want, but one upside is that you can pre-color the epoxy with alcohol-based inks if you want colored slime.

Rubber cement might also be an option. It's nice and slimy so you might find a way to use this to get the effect you want. It might be hard to color or paint, but you could try a few experiments to see if it will work for you.

Hopefully this gives you some ideas to play around with or gets you thinking about ways to get that viscous drip look. Others may jump in here with more ideas for drippy slime. All I can say is find something that works for you and play around with it before trying any techniques on your model. Get creative and think divergently!
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#3
(04-30-2017, 12:58 PM)Tob , Wrote:
(04-29-2017, 03:35 PM)RavenZ Wrote: I would like for slime to look like it's about to drip off the worm.  

Welcome RavenZ!

I have a few ideas on this, but I must preface my remarks with a disclaimer that I have never made a Lovecraftian Worm
with slime dripping from it, so I can't really vouch for the efficacy of these techniques for your specific application.

But it comes down to this:  viscosity.  You're going to want something thick and sticky, right?  So I can think of a few ways to get a 'globs of slime' look.

Hot glue might work.  This is fairly simple to make blobs and globs and drippy things.  The downside is that it would have to be painted, but you're going to have to paint most stuff anyway, so it's a toss up.  If you have a glue gun you might want to spend some time experimenting with it to get the slime drips you're looking for.

A tube of caulk (the paintable kind) could also get the look you want to achieve.  This might be easier to work than hot glue if you need a LOT of slime.  It has a longer working time and you can spread it as well as glob it, and you could "pre-fab" some drips and stuff by drawing beads of caulk on waxed paper, letting it cure, then applying the slime globs to your worm.  One advantage to this caulk would be that if you're using clear caulk and you want clear slime, no painting required.  Experiment with this stuff before applying to your project to get the technique down.

Another possibility is epoxy/acrylic resin.  Although this is runnier than the other ideas, if you use fast curing stuff you could freecast some good drips if you time everything just right.  Another option is the waxed paper trick; drizzle some epoxy on waxed paper, let it cure, then peel it up and apply the drippy drizzles to your model.  Again, this might take some experimentation/trial and error to get the look you want, but one upside is that you can pre-color the epoxy with alcohol-based inks if you want colored slime.

Rubber cement might also be an option.  It's nice and slimy so you might find a way to use this to get the effect you want.  It might be hard to color or paint, but you could try a few experiments to see if it will work for you.

Hopefully this gives you some ideas to play around with or gets you thinking about ways to get that viscous drip look.  Others may jump in here with more ideas for drippy slime.  All I can say is find something that works for you and play around with it before trying any techniques on your model.  Get creative and think divergently!

Thank you very much! for the warm welcome and all the suggestions. I think I will try some clear caulk and some colour hot glue sticks, hopefully both of those mediums combined will give me the effect that I'm looking for, Thank you very much for all your advice, once I have finished the sculpt and find out where I can upload photos, so that I can share the link for my sculpt so that I can share my before and after photos with everyone. Smile
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#4
Tob, I can't think of a thing I'd add to this. You always have fantastic ideas for creative use of materials.
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#5
Another thing you can do with epoxy is glue a bit of monofilament fishing line where you want a drip to be, and build up layers of epoxy on that.

Gives a bit more control and also strength.
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